CleAning towels and rags - Cleaning Talk - Professional Cleaning and Restoration Forum
 
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post #1 of Old 02-14-2015, 10:27 AM Thread Starter
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CleAning towels and rags

I am curious as to what everyone uses for their towels/rags... I see many people use microfiber for dusting but I am interested in hearing about the towels you use for kitchen and bathroom cleaning. I have bought those white terry cloth "shop" towels and am not a fan.... As well I have just used old bath towels that I have collected throughout the years. I am looking for a nice semi thick towel that is not as big as a bath towel.... Any suggestions?
Thanks in advance!
Oh, also, anyone know of a good book that lists cleaning techniques and solutions or What type of products can be used on certain surfaces.
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post #2 of Old 02-19-2015, 09:32 PM
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I use the microfiber rags in every area, except for toilets (I use paper towels). I have different colors for each use, like I use green in kitchens, yellow in bathrooms, etc...

On solutions, I use a 50/50 alcohol and water mixture for disinfecting toilets and it works get on grimy blinds. It's also great on glass and mirrors too. I also use simple green for general cleaning.

I hope this help a bit.
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post #3 of Old 02-20-2015, 04:13 AM
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Microfiber rags/towels are the safest bet. They clean up really well and doesn't leave thread residue as much as old towels do. I guess they work to some extent but would aren't really as time-efficient as microfiber counterparts. You prolly have to do twice the work most of the time just to get the same results.

-Paul
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post #4 of Old 02-20-2015, 10:07 AM
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Back in the 90's we used red shop towels to dust and white towels for everything else..... back in the 90's. As soon as microfiber came out we changed. I don't know what the directions are nowadays because we wash & dry as we do anything else but back when they first came out the directions said to NEVER put them in the dryer. So, our house was 3 floors, 2000sf per floor and in the basement I had towels hung all over! It was a very large towel maze. lol
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post #5 of Old 02-27-2015, 10:04 PM
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I use lots of the microfiber cloths. I don't put them in the dryer, either, but I do bleach them, despite instructions not to do so. I feel I have to since I'm not using a commercial washer.

Bleaching definitely diminishes their effective life, and I get about 40-60 good cleanings with each one before retiring it to a different use. So I buy a new set every few months, but they aren't expensive (I buy mine at WalMart in a big pack).

I also use the small white terry cloths for polishing stainless steel and when I use furniture polish on some furniture.

I use a big, old terry cloth bath towel at the base of a bath or shower, to collect any drips.

Hope this helps, along with everyone else's great ideas!

Wendy Williams
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post #6 of Old 02-28-2015, 12:41 AM
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Just wondering, how does a commercial washer do a better job than a regular washer?
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post #7 of Old 02-28-2015, 12:33 PM
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I've only read that commercial washers do a far superior job of cleaning than home/residential models. I imagine that's how hotels and other big commercial establishments get their laundry so clean, even without bleach.

Anyway, I still bleach my microfiber cloths - but I air dry them. If I did both, I'm sure I'd cut their life by half again.

Wendy
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post #8 of Old 02-28-2015, 10:42 PM
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I thought we might be missing something so I just wanted to know. lol I actually own an appliance store so that's why I was asking. The big companies might tell consumers a lot of things but the real difference is maybe a little more horse power to the motor or maybe heavy duty wires or transmission... stuff like that. Nothing that a person would be able to see in clothing. If you get in to the huge machines..... there is a big difference in the parts but it still just washes with water.... nothing really different.

I was talking to my service guy on the phone when I saw your post last night so I asked him to make sure and he agreed with me. So I just wanted to make sure you didn't know something we didn't.
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post #9 of Old 03-01-2015, 12:08 AM
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So cool, I learn something new every day! I had never heard of a "commercial washer" until a year or two ago, and though, "Hmmm, never knew that." But it made sense. What you say sounds about right, just a larger machine with a bit more horsepower. Thanks for sharing! Love learning new things :-)
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post #10 of Old 03-01-2015, 02:40 AM
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It sounds like you are serious about killing germs so here are a few tid bits. Once your towels are in the washer and it is filled with water and the proper amount of bleach, push the knob in and let them sit for atleast 10 minutes. Bleach doesn't work instantly. For instance, a waitress is required by law, to wash a table with a wet cloth and bleach... do not dry... let air dry for 10 minutes so the bleach stays on the table for 10 minutes. I know we sometimes sit down before that 10 minutes is up but just in case you've ever wondered why the table might still be wet, that is why.

I worked with THE major detergent manufacturer many years ago and did you know that the only thing soap does is give clothes a smell. The only clothes that really need soap to help get the dirt out are for the guys that work in the oil field or mechanic... anyone that gets their clothes greasy like that. As for cleanliness.... the water and agitation will do all the work for normal dirt.

Do you know how the washer and dryer manufacturers are trying to make the washers to spin more water out of clothes with the top notch washers? They filmed a dog shaking itself off and watched it in slow motion and they have tried to incorporate that in to how a washer spins clothes.
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post #11 of Old 03-01-2015, 12:31 PM
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Very interesting, indeed! I did know about the soap, that it does very little. I try to explain that to people who think that so many of the "green" all-purpose cleaners out there really just leave a scent and do very little cleaning. But that's another thread :-)
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post #12 of Old 03-01-2015, 09:53 PM
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Wow sprintcar you seem to have a lot of businesses! I'm barely keeping up with one. Anyways, wendiki, you shouldn't really underestimate green cleaners. Yeah some are less effective than bleach and other concentrated solutions but also keep in mind that they are readily available, cheaper and are generally safer to use. They also greatly reduce indoor air pollution. For every good thing it can do there is an equivalent drawback. Besides, households that are strict on using "green cleaners" make it even more profitable for us.
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post #13 of Old 05-14-2015, 04:01 AM
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Thank you all for the useful information!
End of Tenancy Cleaning Chelsea
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post #14 of Old 05-14-2015, 10:07 AM
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I try about any business that comes to mind and sounds like something that I might like and might make money. The worst that can happen is that it doesn't work and I shut it down. Nowadays I don't do the ones that require me to do a lot of work. For example, my buddy wants to put up $50k and do a food truck but I won't do it because I know I'll be stuck doing manual labor and they are a PITA..... gotta get up with the birds and that ain't happening. So that will be one that passes me by.

We only live once.... if there is anything that you've ever wanted to do... take the chance, see if it will work. Don't spend too much money on it though. Lots and lots and lots of businesses can be started under $1000 and even more can be started on less than $2000. If a person doesn't have an extra $2000 and they are in the cleaning business, they are doing something really wrong! If you just read that and don't have an extra $2k then tell me why..... I can't think of many reasons besides a very, very deathly sick child or spouse.

I'd love to have an ice cream place or even a big candy store but it is too much work at this point. I should have done that 15 years ago. But ya never know with me.... 5 years down the road I might wake up and be in the candy store business before the next day. lol
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post #15 of Old 05-23-2015, 03:13 AM
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I would use a detergent similar to Tide Free and Clear.
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post #16 of Old 07-27-2015, 07:17 AM
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There is always a lot to think about when choosing such services. No one will want just about anyone to clean his or her office. The Commercial cleaning services in Franklin are easily accessible at any time of the day; they use the best cleaning equipment and the green cleaning products.

They are experienced and knowledgeable. They have never disappointed their clients or customers.
Franklin, Massachusetts (USA)
Phone No.- 508-446-3144
http://www.jeanannecleaningservices.com
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