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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here's a great idea I got from a painting contractor in VA.

With all the unlicensed and uninsured station wagon bandits around it’s hard to sell your higher price to your customers!
A great way to set yourself apart is to prepare a Contractor Check List for your customers.

Basically, a contractor check list is a list of questions for a homeowners to ask the next contractor who gives them an estimate.
How much liability insurance do you have?
Are you licensed in the state of XXX?
Do they provide a printed/detailed estimate?
How long is the warranty?
How long have you been in business?
Will you provide estimates?
Etc?

Then you have a few columns for their answers. Your company's stats are already printed in your column. Make sure you ask the questions that highlight your company’s strengths.

Thoughts?
 

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Those are great as long as they are not also abused to lie and knock down other good contractors. I see this way to often in the pwing field. If it is all truth then that is fine, but I don't like the lieing
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Very true Dave. I've seen guys who have been in business for 20 years put something like "Have you been in business 20+ years | Yes or NO" which is not valid for a check list in my opinion. It shuts people out instead of giving people something to evaluate.
A better question would be "How long have you been in business" and you then could fill in 20 years for your field.

I've also seen people lie. There was one painter in our area that put 10 years of experience but really he had 2 people with 5 years and even that wasn't consistently working experience. It was misleading.

Anyways... good point. These should be used to draw out valid points and to show people what they are paying for such as licensed, insured, quality materials, etc...
 

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This is called education marketing, and all your doing is telling the prospect what a professional company would consist of. If it goes right obviously they would hire you after its said and done. It's good to hit on your good points but not to bash your competition.
 
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