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These questions are for those who routinely use subcontractors or plan to use subcontractors to perform commercial cleaning duties.

As most of us are aware, most, if not all, of our contracts with our clients are non-binding in nature. They can let us go at any notice without honoring the full term of our contract, and without pay. That being said, do any of the following conditions apply:

1. Can the main contractor successfully and legally sue the client for monies owed, even if the mutual contract was non-binding, in nature?

2. Can a sub-contractor (sub) file a mechanic's lien for funds owed by the contractor? If so, is lien filed to client or to main contractor? Does this even apply, even in non-binding contracts?

3. Can a sub sue the main contractor for breach of contract if monies are not paid and if filing a mechanic's lien is not applicable, given the circumstances?

By the way, I am not a lawyer but just need to understand what owners need to be aware of dealing with subs in the commercial cleaning world.
 

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Don't worry, this is a common problem. Find a good lawyer.
I think you need the advice of a qualified lawyer. Any work performed by you must be paid according to the employment contract. When I had a tangle with an employer who did not pay me compensation, I contacted one of the lawyers Estate Planning Services | Attorney | Southwest PDX Law Group. You can't let employers fool you. Otherwise, it will happen all the time. I know almost nothing about the agreements between clients and the management of cleaning companies. But it doesn't matter cause such a situation can happen to workers in any field. You should discuss these issues with a lawyer. The specialist will tell you the surest way to achieve compensation.
 

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A specialist in any field has the right to timely receive a salary or compensation in case of unforeseen odds. You asked whether a contractor could legally sue a client for money owed to him, even if the mutual contract was optional. I think so, but it would be better to ask a lawyer. I used the services of a Military attorney only once in my life when I was in the army. But I will remember this trial and the impeccable work of my lawyer for the rest of my life. Since then, I am sure that no matter how difficult the situation is, you need to find an experienced lawyer. I wish you confidence in your rightness. Only in this way will you achieve results.
 
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