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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi. I started my residential cleaning business in November. I have had great response and am now completely booked. In fact, I am now turning people down. Anyway, I have not had many problems figuring out the right products to use. What I have had problems with is EXCESSIVE PET HAIR! How do you deal with this? I have one client that has so much pet hair that I have to use a microfiber dry mop and a vacuum and I still don't get it all. I am contemplating adding a "pet fee". What are your thoughts on this?
 

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Tell me what I'm right about and tell me what I'm wrong about. I need to know how you do things in order to explain how to do them differently.

A) You advertise on Craigslist and have most customers from there.

B) You give a price over the phone.

C) You never see the house until you get there to clean for the first time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
None of the above

A. I advertise on Craigslist, but have not gained a single client from it.

I have a business facebook page that is very beneficial. I have gained many clients through others liking and sharing my page. It is the "word of mouth" of social media.

I also utilize Care.com I have only gained a few clients from this, but it is a nice way to create a profile for yourself. There is the ability to have descriptions, references, and reviews. It is a great tool to have. You can direct interested clients to your Facebook page as well as your Care.com profile

B. NEVER give the price over the phone. I have made this mistake. If you want you can give an "estimate", but be sure the client knows that price is subject to change. You have no idea what shape the home is in. A 2 bedroom, one bath could be a bigger job than a 4 bedroom, 3 bath.

C. You should see the home prior to the first cleaning. You will do this on your consultation visit. See above.

Hope this helps :)
 

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Very good job!

Do you not see the pet hair when you bid? If so, you don't need to say, "Damn lady... your dogs lose more hair than a beauty shop cuts in a week. For that I've got to charge you extra.". Just make the note in your head.... extra work.... so I better add on $10 or $15 when I work up a price. Depending how bad it is.

And then if they say.... WHOA!! That price is HIGH. Just say, for example, "Well, the price for a normal cleaning would be $85 but with all the pet hair it will take an extra 30 minutes for I've got to raise it to $99."

And since your schedule is full, you can wheel & deal accordingly. But either way, I wouldn't come out and say there is a pet fee, just add it in.

On the houses you already have, if you decide to add a pet fee, do it 1 house at a time. Anytime you raise prices do not do it to every customer at once.

Sounds like you have a good thing going as long as your rates are high enough. Don't take lots of jobs for low pay... take fewer jobs with higher pay.

Keep us updated and I hope I helped. :thumbsup:
 

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I think you are in the right track. I just don't think you should put a "pet fee" or whatever you want to call it. That would make you lose customers. Just talk to the client about it and up the price. If the client declines then move on to the next one. I'd agree with sprintcar on the last part. Try to get as much profit for less work that way you won't be burning yourself up every week or two. In this industry, your body is your most important tool so take good care of it.

-Paul

_________________________________________________________________
Home Cleaning Service ND
Enjoy massive daily discounts on cleaning and office wholesale supplies @
www.northlandwholesale.com
 

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Thanks, that information helped me too. I'm new on here so hope this comes up like I'm visualizing it will.
 

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Hi,

You are doing it the right way. Even in Mr. Homecare, we use microfiber dry mop and vacuum. I totally understand how stubborn is pet hair to remove off the carpet. But adding extra for 'pet fee', I really don't think that is good for your business. Instead, implement more efficiemt solutions to this problem and gain more customers. Try following the procedures mentioned below. They usually help.

Pull off the fur with pet hair broom

1. Rub the pet hair broom into the carpet. This broom has static electricity that attracts and lifts away the stringent fur from the carpet.
2. Brush the area in short strokes towards the nozzle of the vacuum. As the fur is lifted and released, the vacuum will suck the hair before it gets settled back into the carpet.
3. Repeat the process until the entire hair is removed.

Use a Pumice stone

Customers would be really happy to see you using natural way to remove pet hair. And yes! Pumice stone is really an effective method. Personally I have experienced. Rub the stone in a single direction over the carpet, upholstery and fabrics and push the hair towards the nozzle of the vacuum and let it suck it. The abrasive action in the stones helps pull hair away from the carpet.

Also this article might help you deal with pet hair.

All the best! :)
 
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Pet hair cleaning

Try using the rubber side of a window squeegee.

Alternatively, you can use a vacuum cleaner head which has a brush designed for tiles and hardfloor surfaces. This is what we do, we have one in each van specifically for pet hair which also gets disinfected after each use since we don't like cross contamination when cleaning other peoples houses.
 

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This topic made me smile. When promoting my business, I make it plain that I love cats, and know how to deal with issues like hair. Over time, nearly ALL my customers have cats, because they know I am not turned off by "cat issues." And when they go on vacation, they hire me to cat sit!!! (I charge the same amount as I do for cleaning.) Works out well for everyone.

Pet hair doesnt get to me. This is why I bought a Shark Rocket vacuum, because it does so well with pet hair. And has an LED headlight so I cann where the kitty litter is on floors.

Certain types of kitty litter DO bug me. The clay types, here in humid Florida, stick to hard surface floors, making mopping more difficult.

To get pet hair off furniture, I use a foam sponge, one made to wash dishes. The Dollar Store sells packs of 8 for $1. When I rub it over the furnitures upholstery, I get up nearly all the pet hair.
 

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I had a long-haired dog. I lived with him for 17 years and his hair wasn't a problem for me. I bought special furniture that is easier to clean and also it is important to brush them once in three days because if you don't do this all of the old hair will fall somewhere in the house. I miss him a lot. Once I bought for my son a frog. and after one month of in our family the frog disappeared, I was joking that the dog ate it. After years I found out what eats frogs, and there was said that dogs can eat frogs, and now I think maybe my joke wasn't a joke :)
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What Eats a Frog?
 
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