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Ok guys i'm going to skip the introduction forum cause i'm getting desperate. I have to start by saying i'm estatic that I found u! So my partner and I have a cleaning company. The client base isnt a prob and we've done very well so far. The employees are a different story. As soon as I manage to build up another 10 clients 1 of my team quits. How do you keep them motivated? I've tried everything but they still quit. Our clients are loyal but they're getting sick of the turn over staff. Any suggestions wud be more then appreciated. Thanx!
 

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Ok guys i'm going to skip the introduction forum cause i'm getting desperate. I have to start by saying i'm estatic that I found u! So my partner and I have a cleaning company. The client base isnt a prob and we've done very well so far. The employees are a different story. As soon as I manage to build up another 10 clients 1 of my team quits. How do you keep them motivated? I've tried everything but they still quit. Our clients are loyal but they're getting sick of the turn over staff. Any suggestions wud be more then appreciated. Thanx!
How much do you pay staff? In my experience, turn over is usually due to low wages. My Gals make $12.50/hr and have stayed with us for a long time.
 

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Good point on pay

How much do you pay staff? In my experience, turn over is usually due to low wages. My Gals make $12.50/hr and have stayed with us for a long time.
I notice Ryanne never responded to your question regarding pay.

People fail to note that the cleaning profession is in fact a career for many people. And if it is what a person plans to do until retirement, then that person wants to make good money.

It is so important to pay well above minimum wage. Otherwise, the job will be treated like a McDonalds or other fast food restaurant and there will be turnover.

In Maryland, minimum wage is about $6.55 per hour. So to hold on to employees and have them view your business as a "real job" as opposed to a holdover until they find something better, a business owner would need to pay that person a minimum of $9.00 per hour and preferably $12 - $14 per hour.

Otherwise, turnover and I don't blame the workers. Cleaning is a tough job. Very labor intensive.
 

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Here's something to try:

Incentive programs, bonuses, and other perks.

I barter services with a salon owner to get gift certificates for the girls to go to the salon and get pampered. Of course, that's not their payment for the cleaning...it's above the wages they get for cleaning the home.

I bartered with a massage therapist who does hot stone massage and gives a total of two hours per session. In return, the massage therapist gets gift certificates from me to give to her own clients...and I gain business as a result! The massages are a real big hit with the girls!

Contests like "who can get the most client compliments" and "give me your ideas to be more productive" are a win-win for all. I pay a bonus on their ideas, performance, and efficiency.

Those are just some ideas to work from. My girls make an average of 10-15 an hour (we pay a percentage) so it's up to THEM on how much they make an hour.

I hope that helps.
 

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It is so important to pay well above minimum wage. Otherwise, the job will be treated like a McDonalds or other fast food restaurant and there will be turnover.

In Maryland, minimum wage is about $6.55 per hour. So to hold on to employees and have them view your business as a "real job" as opposed to a holdover until they find something better, a business owner would need to pay that person a minimum of $9.00 per hour and preferably $12 - $14 per hour.

Otherwise, turnover and I don't blame the workers. Cleaning is a tough job. Very labor intensive.
I totally agree with you and can honestly say that paying well has aided me in retaining a wonderful staff for many many years. When others are complaining about turnover the first thing I ask is - how much are you paying?
 

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T. Peterson,

How many cleaning techs do you now have as opposed to when you first started?

For those who are newbies like myself, I subscribe to the "Tips" newsletter put out by Debbie Sardone of California. She has a very successful house cleaning business and has had it for 20 years now. The tips she gives for setting up a business and retaining employees are fantastic.

http://www.themaidcoach.com/
 

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For the first 20 year I had a staff that hovered at around 25 full time employees at any given time. However we are currently at 6 full time and 2 part-time right now. That is because I took the better part of a year off closing my company down a while back. I needed knee surgery and a break, so I turned over the reins to my daughter while I sat at home and did as little as possible ~ a luxury that I had never afforded myself in all of my years of working (hell, to tell the truth I seldom took vacations or sick days and was even reluctant to take time off from work to go to the doctors, ect.)

I soon found out that cleaning is in my blood so I returned from my break refreshed and ready for another 20 years. :D

BTW - Debbie Sardone is based out of Texas, she is a good lady
 

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Hi,
Again I agree with everyone else wages are very important in this.
Why don't you have a leavers questionnaire for them to fill out before they leave. At least you will know why they are leaving.
 
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