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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What are your thoughts on sealing grout? I've heard arguments on both sides for this and would be interested to hear your view.

Thank.
 

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If they want to pay to have it sealed, then seal it. I have never seen any ill effects from being sealed. Never seen any from not being sealed. I have seen poor installation confused for damage due to not sealing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've heard some people say that it can be harder to get stains out if the grout is sealed. not sure if there is truth to that or not?
 

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Nathan, I will try not to be to wordy here but here is a snap-shot on sealers.
There are three basic types of sealers for stone and grout.
1, Penetrating sealers, generaly sylicon either water or solvent based. These sealers penetrate the stone or grout and become part of the product. You cannot see them on the surface and they help prevent staining. Used on all types of stone, Marble, Slate, Sandstone, Granite and the grout for all. They are desireable if you do not want to change the appearance of the surface and should be applied every 1 to 2 yrs as a rule.
2, Topical sealers, generaly acrylic or polymer and water based. They act much as floor finish would and enhance the gloss of the surface while preventing most staining. They are generaly affected by urine, amonia, alchol, ect. The downside to these is they will have to be reapplied and/or stripped and reapplied on a regular basis.
3, Permanent type sealers, These are generaly solvent based urathane type products. Althoughly rarely seen, Run don't walk away. Very difficult to remove if peeling or damaged and rusult in Hazard waste disposal amoung other problems.
If you would like any more info, contact me.
Randy
 

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Nathan,
I forgot to answer you original question. Stains are only more difficult to remove if someone has sealed over the stain. Sealers are designed to prevent stains from penatrating the surface making them easier to remove.
 

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sealers

I do tile and grout cleaning. That's all we do and I hear some interesting stuff regardig seaing.

I think there is certainly some misconceptions on what sealers do and do not do.

I have heard many tile installers say that sealing doesn't make a difference or it is a waste.

But the question is: How many floors does a tile installer have to CLEAN per week?

Not too many.

I think some people think that a sealer will keep the floor from getting dirty - which is false. The main benefit for a sealer is the repellency of water and oils. That's pretty much all they do, is prevent a liquid from penetrating the grout joint.

This prevents staining. Staining occurs when a liquid carriers a particle or substance into the depths of the grout line where it cannot be easily removed. If your grout is sealed the particle will stay on the top of the grout or near the top.

Case in point: I cleaned two houses the same week that were next door neigbors to one another. One house had sealed the tile the other house didn't. They were in a big subdivistion and built within a month of each other.

The first house which was sealed came out WHITE and nice - actually there are some pictures I took...

let me see if I can find -'em


here ya go:








The house next door which wasn't sealed had significantly more staining. The grout was much harder to restore and soil removal was tougher.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Great to have you on the site diego and thanks for the examples. Great stuff! :thumbup:
 

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Diego, My guess is that is a ceramic or porcelin tile and the grout was sealed with a penatrating silicon sealer. That was just my point earlier. Does not stop them from getting dirty, but prevents penetration so they can be cleaned. Nice work/
Randy
 

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Cementitious grouts are porous and should be sealed to offer some form of protection from staining. There are no adverse side effects of sealing grout with a clear sealer. Following any deep cleaning of your tile and grout, a clear sealer should be applied to help protect your grout surface from staining. A deep cleaning will increase the porousity of your grout and it should be protected with a clear sealer to add some stain protection and make subsequent cleanings more productive.
 

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Make sure grout lines aren't cracked, chipped, or otherwise compromised before treating with a sealant. If they are, touch up grout and wait the requisite 48 to 72 hours before sealing.
Some sealers need more time between sealer coats. For these sealers, wait 5 minutes and then wipe off the tiles to remove grout sealant that got on them.
 

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Make sure grout lines aren't cracked, chipped, or otherwise compromised before treating with a sealant. If they are, touch up grout and wait the requisite 48 to 72 hours before sealing.
Some sealers need more time between sealer coats. For these sealers, wait 5 minutes and then wipe off the tiles to remove grout sealant that got on them.
You can't simply "touch up" compromised grout. You need to remove the bad grout to a suitable depth and regrout to complete a proper repair. I fix so many so called grout repairs where a company or a homeowner tries to do an "overlay" of grout on the affected area without the proper prep work. "overlaying" is the hack way to do grout repairs and should be avoided.
 

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Grout is a cement based material, which is very porous. If it is only cleaned, it will stain again as it absorbs moisture, causing stains and mold. Grout should always be sealed with a quality sealer, preventing the passage of moisture. D’Sapone uses a pigmented titanium sealer, making grout waterproof with a 5 year labor warranty.
 
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